February 11, 2009

Wilders denied entrance to UK

Dutch MP and leader of the Freedom Party Geert Wilders has come once again into the limelight. But this time it is not because of the low esteem in which he is held by the Dutch court which three weeks ago ordered his criminal prosecution for his “anti-Islamic hate speech,” that is for his statements against Islamofascism, considered “insulting” by the Court itself. This time, in fact, scheduled to attend the screening of his film Fitna in the House of Lords on Thursday, he has been denied access to the United Kingdom, because his presence might threaten civil order and “civil harmony.”

This would be in itself an absolutely unbelievable story. Yet, since I couldn’t say that I’ve never seen anything like this in our old, decadent Europe, I must admit that this is practically the rule, not the exception. Take the case, for example, of commentator and author Douglas Murray, who was due to chair “Islam or Liberalism: Which is the Way Forward?” at the London School of Economics on January 23, but the LSE asked him not to attend in the interest of “public safety” as his presence could provoke unrest … How sad!

See here and here for further details.



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4 comments:

  1. Sad. Countries like the Netherlands, France, and Britain are committing slow-motion suicide with excessive immigration and mindless worship of diversity.

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  2. Yes, and Oriana Fallaci must be turning in her grave! Read this!

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  3. It's odd that countries mentioned by Tom plus my native Canada have always prided themselves as being nations of great leaders.

    No more.

    The disease of gutless leaders exists here too.

    Rob, isn't Fallaci a tad, shall we say, excessive if not distasteful?

    I'm all for being vigilant but...there are limits, no?

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  4. In my view Oriana was a kind of lay prophet who turned out to have been right on all fronts. Of course she was very provocative, and her latest writings—actually a very peculiar “literary genre”—were imbued with a sense of urgency that makes them both disturbing and enlightening. She was “excessive” because of the “excessiveness” of our times.

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